About

US

Invisible Brain Injury Association

The Invisible Brain Injury Association brings together people with ABI survivors (from TBI, stroke, tumors and other brain pathologies), family members and friends, relatives, friends and neurorehabilitation clinicians. The aim of this association is to raise awareness of ABI invisible impairments. We share first-person testimonies and professional opinions.

The project grew out of the first-person experience of most of the people who make up the association.

Social and professional ignorance of these invisible consequences, does not facilitate ABI survivor´s rehabilitation or acceptance. For this reason, we think it is very important to draw attention to them and make awareness of this invisible handicaps through testimonies.

DCA y otras dolencias. Asociación Daño Cerebral Invisible.

We are part of:

Variación Isotipo Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Our main objective is to make ABI survivors, people around them and clinicians understand the most invisible consequences of an acquired brain injury.

BEST ASSESMENT

ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS

BEST REHABILITATION

Greater understanding

better acceptance

best adaptation

Isotipo Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

What do

we do?

We are dedicated to raise awareness of the ABI invisible impairments through writings, videos, and talks. We share first-person testimonies from those affected and their families, as well as technical contributions from neurorehabilitation clinicians.

We also try to improve the quality of life of ABI survivors with tools and support.

Asociación Daño Cerebral Invisible.

Projects

Braini2

Blood biomarkers to improve diagnosis and management of mild traumatic BRAIN Injury in vulnerable patients.

We are currently participating as a patient association in this project, funded by the European Union. We are contributing our perspective and experience to help achieve a better detection of a possible brain injury after a mild TBI, and improve mild TBI assessment and monitoring.

The project incorporates measurement of promising blood-based brain biomarkers to predict immediate and mid-term complications after a suspected mild TBI. This in-vitro diagnosis solution could aid to reduce excessive brain medical imaging scan (CT scan) and associated radiation, while reducing the time of beginning a rehabilitation when necessary.”

Testimonies

Recording of testimonial videos and writings of those affected, relatives and professional opinions

Blog

Aurora Lassaletta maintains her reference blog with new regular entries

Book

The book “Invisible Brain Damage” by Aurora Lassaletta, discloses the invisible sequelae.

Isotipo Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Team

Aurora Lassletta. Asociación Daño Cerebral Invisible.
Semicírculos Logo Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Aurora Lassaletta

I am Aurora. I have lived with ABI as a result of a TBI caused by a serious traffic accident in 2005. All the health care attention was given to the rehabilitation of my mobility. I learnt of my cognitive, emotional and behavioral impairments that took a long time to have a diagnosis, specific neuroimaging tests and receive adequate rehabilitation.

As a clinical psychologist, at my new pace I give psychological support to ABI survivors throughout their rehabilitation and acceptance process. My mission has become to raise awareness of these invisible symptoms, through talks, the blog, my book.

With this same aim I have created this association, surrounded by a wonderful team with great enthusiasm to work together.

Verónica Martínez. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.
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Verónica Martínez​

I am Verónica, from A Coruña, mother of Cecilia and Teo and urban architect. Since 2004 I have been living and working in Madrid as a consultant in urban planning and mobility, especially dedicated to children and their relationship with the city and public space.

In 2013 I had a polytraumatic train accident with a severe TBI that caused Brain Injury. I did neurorehabilitation at CEADAC, where I discovered brain complexity and its relationship with personal autonomy. Since 2015, I have been running “Road to CEADAC” workshops on accessibility and mobility, to help recover personal autonomy in urban displacements after ABI. In 2020 I did the Master’s Degree in Disability, Personal Autonomy and Dependency Care from the Menéndez Pelayo International University and the Law and Disability Foundation.

Alicia Artiaga. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.
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Alicia Artiaga​

I am Alicia and I have a brain injury that is invisible to the eyes of the majority. It is difficult for me to find my place, because most of the capacities that I recognized in myself have not diminished since my motorcycle accident. It’s some processes that I didn’t pay attention to (such as planning, starting tasks or taming my will) that don’t work like before. I imagine my head connected to a funnel with a very narrow outlet. On one side, a hotbed of ideas, hypotheses and projects; to the other… a trickle that often seems meager. I understand, more than ever, the value and beauty of teamwork. Senior Telecommunications Engineer and Coach specialized in Adolescents and Family, always with a genuine interest in the person and now, also, obsessed with the mechanisms that encourage us to take action. I accompany people of different ages and different abilities, sure that everyone’s path leads to understanding that our talents are complementary.

Amor Bizé. Asociación Daño Cerebral Invisible.
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Amor Bize

I am a neuropsychologist and I have been working for more than 20 years at the State Brain Damage Care Center, where every day I realize how important it is for affected people and their families to understand why the limitations they experience appear and how to deal with them. they.

Fernando Romero. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.
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Fernando Romero

I am Fernando, I have a wife and four children, and they say that dad is “LAWYERPOET”. I think they say this because, after discovering and removing in 2015 a brain tumor that was formed in my mother’s womb, today I cannot practice as a Lawyer or dedicate myself to managing companies. My impaired ability to create memories and the difficulties I now find in planning and carrying out any work, physically and intellectually, however simple it may seem, do not allow it. My reconstructed life, after the brain injury, is allowing me, not without effort, to make the most of my poet and father side. And, as a volunteer, to be able to help many people who, in my previous life, I would probably not have been aware of their needs.

Belen Laureano RIco. Asociación Daño Cerebral Invisible
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Belen Laureano

I am Belén, a neuropsychologist and contextual therapist who, after more than 10 years of experience in invisible brain injury, has been able to see the uncertainty that accompanies both the person who suffers it and their environment, and the suffering that this generates on a daily basis. a day. On this road, many changes, doubts, fears, insecurities tend to appear as part of the process, as we are not always taught or have the tools to face this new life challenge.

My daily objective is to accompany by training with useful tools to face the change that allows people to move forward finding a new meaning in their lives.

Rafael P. Martínez. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.
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Rafael P. Martínez

My name is Rafa, I am an educator and I am very interested in everything related to diversity and social inclusion. Since 2021 I live all this in first person. In February of that year I had a stroke and as a result I have acquired brain injury, “something” that limits my ability to stay focused, memorize or communicate with others. These impairments, which are sometimes hard to recognize at first glance represent a great challenge for me. For this reason, after passing through CEADAC and meeting Aurora Lassaletta, I began to be aware of the importance of making invisible brain injury visible.

Semicírculos Logo Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Raquel García

I am Raquel, a collection of puzzle pieces between adventurer, bookseller, writer and psychologist, in search of rediscovering an identity.

I had a FAVA (arteriovenous fistula) that took more than a year to be diagnosed and that got complicated in the operating room.

I have problems with attention, organization, noise, inhibition of distractors and cognitive fatigue. In return I have gained a different way of relating to the world and a desire to move on.

Sandra Fernández. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.
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Sandra Fernández

I am Sandra Fernández, I was a special education teacher. I have two daughters, 5 and 8 years old.

Five and a half years ago, 26 weeks pregnant, I suffered a brain hemorrhage, due to a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) from birth. But life gave me another chance, always with a smile and hope!

Andrés Melero. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.
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Andrés Melero

Andrés Melero, 47 years old, Ingrid’s partner and Nora, Chloe and Elsa’s father. In 2018 epileptic seizures revealed my Brain Tumor. I was operated and they removed a piece of the left hippocampus and amygdala. The surgical success left a hole in my brain with no neurons. Cerebrospinal fluid only. Today Amnesia, Raynaud’s, Aphasia, Hyperacusis, Anomia… are some of my invisible injuries. Family, friends, writing, music, sports and networks, my best medicine. Love and humor help me a lot.

Santiago Alcalde. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.
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Santiago Alcalde

I am Santiago, I am 70 years old, a Natural Sciences teacher until 2005, when I had a car accident in Asturias. It was night time, it was raining and I was alone. I was very unstable for a month and a half, then rehabilitation in La Beata, on an outpatient basis until today. My family is the best thing I have in the world, along a wonderful relationship with many friends. I am officially disabled, although I am well enough to function in almost everything. I am delighted to participate in our association.

Luz Prieto. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.
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Luz Prieto

Hi, I’m Luz. In 2017, I had a myocardial infarction with 18 minutes of heart stop, which caused me a brain injury with low vision sequelae. I see a fairly blurred tunnel. I do not have good stability. In my head… noises, cross conversations annoy me, there are days when I get up as if I were drunk.

José Monpean. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.
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Jose Mompeán

Back in August 2021, at my tender age of 46, an ischemic stroke began to attack me at night time with malice in order to spread my ABI more fiercely through my little brain. This left me with important physical sequelae, as well as other less obvious and unknown ones, by the general public and that it is necessary to make them visible. Two days later, already in the stroke unit of the San Carlos Clinical Hospital, a stroke – this time hemorrhagic – tried to attack me again. When I left the hospital clinically stabilized, everything was unknown until I discovered my CEADAC, which has opened my eyes and given me hope that a new future is possible. And here we are! Always forward!

Nacho Granados. Asociación Daño Cerebral Invisible.
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Nacho Granados​

I’m Nacho. I am a biologist, teacher, father and a ABI survivor partner. I have accompanied her throughout her recovery and acceptance process. Personally, I have experienced hard times due to the emotional and family burden that it has entailed. I have learned to live with the invisible ABI disabilities and have learnt a lot along the way. At first, I forgot about myself and, as my partner has improved, I have started myself and taking more care of myself.

Aniana García-Morato. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.
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Aniana Gª-Morato

I’m Aniana, a clinical psychologist, mindfulness instructor, and friend of an ABI survivor. I am passionate about learning, working with groups and contributing the mindfulness adapted tool to accompany people that live along with an ABI.

David Monge. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.
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David Monge

I am David Monge Cuenca, I was born in August 1979, I am a Senior Automotive Technician and Professor and Director of Road Training. I suffered 2 head injuries and multiple fractures throughout my body in 2005 and 2016. With the great help of many clinicians and my immense desire to advance and improve, little by little I am reaching my challenges, relearning, improving and adapting to each moment and circumstance of my life. With great desire and effort, I studied Neurorehabilitation and Occupational Therapy, and I will to continue helping by sharing my learning and life experience.

Esther Chumillas. Asociación Daño Cerebral Invisible
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Esther Chumillas

I am Esther from Cuenca, 39 years old, who has lived since 1997 with an ABI that nobody informed me about, after poorly treated meningitis. Transferred to Madrid, 3 months in the hospital, I went through the chronic situation of total blindness and no mobility that gave way to a drug-resistant epilepsy, a visual field of less than 3 degrees and visual agnosia that took more than 3 years to be diagnosed. And that has never been treated. The life of a 13-year-old teenager suddenly changed on an Ash Wednesday. Without information and advice, the isolation that my sequelae caused me forced me to grow up and look for my own strategies, and become the woman I am right now.  Therapeutic Pedagogy teacher, active since 2005, with the sole objective of doing my part for a more inclusive education. I have the support of my husband Manuel and our 4-year-old son Juanma, and I try to enjoy every moment with a smile and optimism.

EsterSinH. Asociación Daño Cerebral Invisible
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EsterSinH

My name is “EsterSinH” (Ester without an H). I was born in 1977 and I was born again in 2020 after my brain disease injury.“Meningoencephalitis” came into my life, and brought many invisible consequences: aphasia, absolute damage to two of my senses, smell and taste, damage in my ears causing tinnitus and tinnitus, the seizures that lasted months, along with other difficult sequelae… Life changed me in everything, but I know that you learn from everything. If I valued life, now more than ever. Through “cerebroestersinh” networks I try to give visibility, normality, transmitting my resilience to the world. Like everyone, after brain damage, even though we have disabilities, we have abilities. I send a hug to my admirable colleagues from “ADCI”, to my people and to the world.
Isotipo Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

The book

The invisible brain injury

Coginitive Impaiments in Traumatic Brain Injury, Stroke and other Acquired Brain Pathologies

A work written by Aurora Lassaletta where she collects her experiences with brain injury.

“Almost from the beginning I was collecting my experience as a diary to try to understand and resolve what was happening to me. A few years later this kind of diary became a book, which tries to make visible the less obvious consequences of ABI.”

Some reviews

“Aurora writes an insightful and engaging account of the consequences of her brain injury which is truly inspiring. This book succinctly describes and demonstrates with such clarity the invisible consequences of TBI that so many experience but find it tricky to explain. Throughout the book she takes us on a journey through these consequences and how she comes to learn to work with them to lessen their impact on her day to day life. Her honesty and openness about the ongoing process of acceptance and reflections on identity within this context is so important in gaining insight into the psychological challenges faced following a TBI. This book will be of great value to those who have experienced a brain injury and their families as well as clinicians and researchers working in the field. I would encourage everyone to read this book who has experience of or interest in the impact of acquired brain injury. Thank you for sharing your experiences.”
Dr Fiona Ashworth, DClinPsych, AFBPsS Anglia Ruskin University, UK
"Wow! This book captures the essence of the brain injury experience brilliantly. It is written in clear language that is easy to read and digest, addressing all the common challenges that people with brain injuries and their families go through in a way that few other such books have done. As both a clinical psychologist and a brain injury survivor, Aurora Lassaletta uniquely applies insightfulness and keen observation to her personal journey from “normal life” to injury and on through years of rehabilitation and personal growth. Her message of perseverance and hard work and hope is an inspiration not only for survivors and their families, but also for professionals, who will undoubtedly re-think their stereotypes of rehabilitation as mostly impairment-based and only relevant in the acute stages of injury. I can’t wait to have the book in hand to recommend to my colleagues and clients with brain injuries alike."
Jill Winegardner, Ph.D. Director of Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center. Cleveland, Ohio USA
"This book, written by a colleague, provides a moving, honest and brave account of the experience of suffering a traumatic brain injury. The narrative and commentary vividly brings to the reader the sheer determination, professional support, and resilience required to make the long journey back to living a meaningful life after suffering a traumatic brain injury. It is essential reading for all of those interested in the real story of what long-term rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury actually entails for many people".
Rudi Coetzer. DClinPsy. Consultant Neuropsychologist & Head of Service, North Wales Brain Injury Service. School of Psychology, Bangor University, UK

Raquel García

Soy Raquel, una colección de piezas de puzzle entre aventurera, librera, escritora y psicóloga, en busca de reencontrar una identidad.

Tuve una FAV (fístula arteriovenosa) que tardaron más de un año en diagnosticar y que se complicó en quirófano.

Tengo problemas con la atención, la organización, el ruido, inhibir distractores y el cansancio cognitivo, a cambio he ganado una manera diferente de relacionarme con el mundo y muchas ganas de seguir adelante.

Rafael P. Martínez. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Rafael P. Martínez​

Mi nombre es Rafa, soy educador y me interesa muchísimo todo lo relacionado con la diversidad y la inclusión social; desde 2021 vivo todo esto en primera persona. En febrero de ese año tuve un ictus y a raíz de ello tengo daño cerebral adquirido, “algo” que limita mi capacidad para mantenerme concentrado, memorizar o comunicarme con los demás. Estas limitaciones que, en ocasiones, cuestan reconocer a simple vista suponen para mí un gran reto. Por eso, tras mi paso por el CEADAC y conocer a Aurora Lassaletta comencé a ser consciente de la importancia que tiene visibilizar el daño cerebral invisible.

Verónica Martínez. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Verónica Martínez

Soy Verónica, coruñesa, madre de Cecilia y Teo y arquitecta urbanista de formación. Desde 2004 vivo y trabajo en Madrid como consultora en urbanismo y movilidad, especialmente dedicada a la infancia y su relación con la ciudad y el espacio público.
En 2013 tuve un politraumatismo en accidente ferroviario con un TCE severo que me causó un Daño Cerebral. Hice la neurorrehabilitación en el CEADAC, donde descubrí la complejidad cerebral y su relación con la autonomía personal. Desde 2015, imparto los talleres “Camino al CEADAC” sobre accesibilidad y movilidad, para ayudar a recuperar la autonomía personal en los desplazamientos urbanos después del DCA. En 2020 hice el Máster en Discapacidad, Autonomía Personal y Atención a la Dependencia de la Universidad Internacional Menéndez Pelayo y la Fundación Derecho y Discapacidad.

Alicia Artiaga. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Alicia Artiaga

Soy Alicia y tengo una lesión cerebral invisible a ojos de la mayoría. Me cuesta encontrar mi sitio, porque la mayor parte de las capacidades que reconocía en mí no han menguado desde mi accidente de moto. Son algunos procesos a los que no prestaba atención (como planificar, iniciar tareas o domar mi voluntad) los que no funcionan como antes. Entiendo, más que nunca, el valor y la belleza del trabajo en equipo. Ingeniera Superior de Telecomunicaciones y Coach especializada en Adolescentes y Familia, desde siempre con interés genuino en la persona y ahora, también, obsesionada por los mecanismos que nos incitan a pasar a la acción. Acompaño a personas de edades diferentes y capacidades diferentes, segura de que el camino de todos pasa por entender que nuestros talentos son complementarios.

Fernando Romero. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Fernando Romero

Soy Fernando, tengo mujer y cuatro hijos, y ellos dicen que papá es “JURISPOETA”. Creo que lo dicen porque, después de descubrirme y extirparme en 2015 un tumor cerebral que se me formó en el vientre materno, hoy por hoy no puedo ejercer como Abogado, ni dedicarme a administrar empresas. Mi dañada capacidad para crear recuerdos y las dificultades que encuentro ahora para planificar y realizar cualquier trabajo, físico e intelectual, por simple que parezca, no me lo permite. Mi vida reconstruida, después del daño cerebral, me está permitiendo, no sin esfuerzo, sacarle el mayor partido a mi faceta de poeta y padre, y, como voluntario, poder ayudar a mucha gente que, en mi otra vida, ni hubiera caído en la cuenta de sus necesidades.

Sandra Fernández. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Sandra Fernández

Soy Sandra Fernández, era profe de educación especial.Tengo dos hijas de 5 y 8 años.
Hace 5 años y medio, estando embarazada de 26 semanas sufrí una hemorragia cerebral, debido a una malformación arteriovenosa de nacimiento. Pero la vida me dió otra oportunidad siempre con sonrisa y con ilusión!.

Andrés Melero. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Andrés Melero​

Andrés Melero, 47 años, pareja de Ingrid y papá de Nora, Cloe y Elsa. En 2018 ataques de epilepsia delataron a mi Tumor Cerebral. Me operaron y me quitaron un trozo de Hipocampo y Amígdala izquierdos. El éxito quirúrgico dejó un hueco sin neuronas en mi cerebro. Solo líquido cefalorraquídeo. Hoy Amnesia, Raynaud, Afasia, Hiperacusia, Anomia… son algunos de mis daños invisibles. Familia, amigos, escritura, música, deporte y redes, mi mejor medicina. Amor y humor me ayudan mucho.

Santiago Alcalde. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Santiago Alcalde

Soy Santiago tengo 70 años, profesor de Ciencias Naturales hasta 2005, en que tuve un accidente de coche en Asturias, era de noche, llovía e iba solo. Estuve “más allá que pacá” mes y medio, luego rehabilitación en la Beata, ambulatoriamente hasta hoy. Mi familia es lo mejor que tengo en el mundo, junto con mis amigos que son muchos y una relación maravillosa. Oficialmente estoy discapacitado, aunque estoy lo suficientemente bien para funcionar en casi todo. Estoy encantado de participar en nuestra asociación.

Luz Prieto. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Luz Prieto

Hola, soy Luz. En el año 2017 me dio un infarto de miocardio con 18 minutos de parada, lo que me provocó un daño cerebral con secuelas de baja visión: veo un túnel bastante difuminado. Tengo la estabilidad regular. En la cabeza… me molestan los ruidos, las conversaciones cruzadas, hay días en que me levanto como si estuviera borracha.

Era peluquera, era feliz… pero ahora me he dado cuenta de que soy más feliz. ¡Me alegro de estar en esta asociación!

José Monpean. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Jose Monpean

Allá por agosto del 2021 a mi tierna edad de 46, un ictus isquémico le dio por atacarme de forma nocturna y con alevosía para así propagar con más fiereza mi DCA por el cerebrito, para dejarme secuelas físicas importantes, así como otras menos evidentes y desconocidas por el público en general y que es necesario visibilizarlas. Dos días después ya en la unidad de ictus del hospital clínico San Carlos, un ictus -esta vez hemorrágico- se quiso cebar conmigo nuevamente. Cuando salí del hospital estabilizado clínicamente todo eran incógnitas hasta que descubrí mi CEADAC, que me ha abierto los ojos y me ha dado esperanzas de que un nuevo futuro es posible. Y en esas estamos. Siempre hacia delante.

Nacho Granados. Asociación Daño Cerebral Invisible.

Nacho Granados

Soy Nacho. Soy biólogo, profesor, padre y pareja de una persona con DCA. La he acompañado en todo su proceso de recuperación y aceptación. Personalmente he vivido momentos duros por la carga emocional y familiar que ha supuesto. He aprendido a convivir con las secuelas invisibles del DCA y he aprendido mucho por el camino. Al principio me olvidé de mí mismo y, a medida que mi pareja ha ido mejorando he ido retomándome y cuidándome más.

Aniana García-Morato. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

Aniana Gª-Morato

Soy Aniana, psicóloga clínica, instructora de mindfulness y amiga de una persona con DCA. Me apasiona aprender, trabajar con grupos y aportar la herramienta del mindfulness adaptada en el acompañamiento de personas con DCA.

David Monge. Asociación daño cerebral invisible.

David Monge

Soy David Monge Cuenca nací en agosto de 1979, soy Tecnico Superior de Automoción y Profesor y Director de Formación Vial. Padecí 2 traumatismos craneoencefálicos y múltiples roturas por todo el cuerpo en 2005 y 2016. Con la gran ayuda de muchos profesionales y mis inmensas ganas de avanzar y superarme, poco a poco fuimos alcanzando mis retos, reaprendiéndo, mejorando y adaptando cada momento y circunstancia de mi vida. Con muchas ganas y esfuerzo estudié Neurorehabilitación y Terapia Ocupacional, con el deseo de seguir ayudando al compartir mi aprendizaje y experiencias de la vida.